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This is the "Definitions" page of the "OATs: Open Access Textbooks " guide.
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OATs: Open Access Textbooks   Tags: humanities, low-cost, open, open access, science, social_sciences, technology, textbooks  

The OATs Libguide provides access to descriptions and links to known initiatives and organizations that support the development and promotion of Open Access textbooks, and to OA and low-cost e-books and textbook catalogs and databases.
Last Updated: Mar 29, 2014 URL: http://instr.iastate.libguides.com/oats Print Guide RSS Updates

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Open Access Textbooks

 

Off-Campus Access

Most of our indexes, ejournals, and full-text articles can be accessed off-campus using your ISU Borrower ID and password.  See Set your Library password for more information. 

Distance Learning students: Can't find your ISUCard number? Login to AccessPlus.  Choose ISU IDs in the left sidebar to find your ISUCard number.  Your Borrower ID is the last 11 digits of your ISUCard number. (Problems? Contact distance@iastate.edu)  See also our DL Guide

 

Definitions

An open textbook is an openly-licensed textbook offered online by its author(s). The open license sets open textbooks apart from traditional textbooks by allowing users to read online, download, or print the book at no additional cost.

For a textbook to be considered open, it must be licensed in a way that grants a baseline set of rights to users that are less restrictive than its standard copyright.  A license or list of permissions must be clearly stated by the author.

Generally, the minimum baseline rights allow users at least the following:

  • to use the textbook without compensating the author 
  • to copy the textbook, with appropriate credit to the author  
  • to distribute the textbook non-commercially
  • to shift the textbook into another format (such as digital or print)

Many authors also grant rights such as:

  • to add, remove or alter content in the textbook, often on the condition that derivative works must  have the same license                            
  • to copy and distribute the textbook without giving credit to the author to use the textbook commercially

Source

[http://www.openaccesstextbooks.org/model/appendixA.html]

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